Cooking Fire Safety

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Many families gather in the kitchen to spend time together, but it can be one of the most hazardous rooms in the house if you don't practice safe cooking behaviors. Cooking equipment, most often a range or stovetop, is the leading cause of reported home fires and home fire injuries in the United States. Cooking equipment is also the leading cause of unreported fires and associated injuries.

Safe Cooking Behaviors

It's a recipe for serious injury or even death to wear loose clothing (especially hanging sleeves), walk away from a cooking pot on the stove, or leave flammable materials, such as potholders or paper towels, around the stove. Whether you are cooking the family holiday dinner or a snack for the children, practicing safe cooking behaviors will help keep you and your family safe.

Choose the Right Equipment and Use It Properly

Use Barbecue Grills Safely

Charcoal Grills

Propane Grills

Watch What You Heat

Keep Things That Can Catch Fire and Heat Sources Apart

If Your Clothes Catch Fire

If your clothes catch fire, stop, drop, and roll. Stop immediately, drop to the ground, and cover face with hands. Roll over and over or back and forth to put out the fire. Immediately cool the burn with cool water for 3 to 5 minutes and then seek emergency medical care.

Use Equipment for Intended Purposes Only

Cook only with equipment designed and intended for cooking, and heat your home only with equipment designed and intended for heating. There is additional danger of fire, injury, or death if equipment is used for a purpose for which it was not intended.

Protect Children from Scalds and Burns

Prevent Scalds and Burns

Install and Use Microwave Ovens Safely

How and When to Fight Cooking Fires

Nuisance Smoke Alarms