Career firefighter job demands and high blood pressure

Posted: April 27, 2017

A recent research study by the University of California, Irvine – School of Medicine found that there is a link between the job demands of career firefighters and high blood pressure.

doctor taking a firefighter's blood pressure

The study investigated whether working conditions such as number of 24-hour shifts, number of calls, sedentary work, job strain, and other physical demands are associated with elevated blood pressure and hypertension. 330 career firefighters from southern California participated in the study by completing a firefighter-specific occupational health questionnaire and having their blood pressure and hypertension levels clinically assessed.

Research takeaways

Choi, B., Schnall, P., & Dobson, M. (2016). Twenty-four-hour work shifts, increased job demands, and elevated blood pressure in professional firefighters. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 89(7), 1111-1125. doi:10.1007/s00420-016-1151-5

Learn more about this research

This study by the University of California, Irvine – School of Medicine was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

The research article is available through our library by contacting netclrc@fema.dhs.gov. Interested readers may be able to access the article through their local library or through the publisher’s website.

See also: Cardiac fatalities in firefighters

This summary is for informational purposes only. More +
As such, the content does not reflect any official positions, policies, or guidelines on behalf of the sender, the U.S. Fire Administration, FEMA, DHS, nor any other federal agencies, departments or contracting entities. Similarly, this summary does not represent in any manner an official endorsement or relationship to any private or public companies, organizations/associations, or any authors or individuals cited or websites associated within the article.

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